WHO Regional Office for Africa
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    • Nurse Peace (right) counsels a patient before she gets screened for cervical cancer at the RAiSE Foundation office in Niger State on 24 February 2021
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Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Deaths from noncommunicable diseases on the rise in Africa

The rising burden of noncommunicable diseases will exert pressure on treatment and care services

Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes are increasingly becoming the main cause of mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, where the diseases were responsible for 37% of deaths in 2019, rising from 24% in 2000 largely due to weaknesses in the implementation of critical control measures including prevention, diagnosis…

Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Stronger Governance Needed to Fight Superbugs in Africa: Antimicrobial Resistance threatens Africa’s Development

Addressing AMR requires an holistic and multi-sectoral approach

The leaders of six regional organizations in Africa are calling for stronger governance to fight antimicrobial resistance, or AMR, on the eve of World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (18-24 November). The emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance in Africa – where micro-organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are resistant…

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    • Engr Hassan Musa, Parmananent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Environment at the UN Day symposium
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Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

UN Reaffirms Commitment to Ensuring Peace and Prosperity for all in Nigeria

Due to the pandemic, millions of Nigerians have been devastatingly affected through the loss of lives and livelihoods

The United Nations System in Nigeria has reaffirmed its commitment to ensuring peace and prosperity for all in Nigeria. This commitment was made by Dr Walter Kazadi Mulombo, the World Health Organization (WHO) Country Representative and United Nations Resident Coordinator (Ad Interim) during a symposium to commemorate the 2021 UN…

Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Coronavirus: Social, environmental factors seen behind Africa’s low COVID-19 cases

Deaths attributed to COVID-19 have also remained low in the region

COVID-19 transmission in Africa has been marked by relatively fewer infections, which have been on the decline over the past two months, owing to a variety of socio-ecological factors as well as early and strong public health measures taken by governments across the region. The pandemic has largely been in…

Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Coronavirus - Mauritius: Promoting and Protecting Breastfeeding for a better start in Life

The country aims at creating awareness among young people on the importance of breast feeding and its positive contribution to a healthier planet

Mauritius marked World Breastfeeding Week 2020 by an official ceremony performed by Minister of Health and Wellness, Dr Hon. Kailash Jagutpal on 06 August 2020 at the Victoria Hospital, Candos. In line with this year’s theme, the country aims at creating awareness among young people on the importance of breast…

Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Ghana Bolsters Medicines Regulatory System, Guarantees Product Quality

Ghana and Tanzania are the only two of World Health Organization (WHO) African Region’s 47 countries to have attained a Level 3 ranking

Ghana has strengthened its medicines regulatory system to ensure safety, quality and effectiveness of medical products manufactured, imported or distributed within the country, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced today. Ghana becomes the second country in the WHO African Region to attain regulatory system “Maturity Level 3” – the second-highest…

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    • WHO Representative to Namibia, Dr Charles Sagoe-Moses handing over the COVID-19 medical supplies to the Minister of Health and Social Services, Dr Kalumbi Shangula
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Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Coronavirus - Namibia: WHO supports supplies for front line health workers

Health care workers are at the front line of the COVID-19 outbreak response and as such are exposed to hazards that put them at risk of infection

The first United Nations ‘Solidarity’ flight started delivering vital medical supplies from last week to all countries in Africa where these are needed the most.  The flight was facilitated by the World Food Programme and included WHO supported supplies of face shields, gloves, goggles, gowns, masks, medical aprons and thermometers. Supplies for…

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    • West and Central Africa Expands Access to HIV Treatment, But Falls Short of Targets (1)
    • West and Central Africa Expands Access to HIV Treatment, But Falls Short of Targets (2)
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Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

West and Central Africa Expands Access to HIV Treatment, But Falls Short of Targets

At the end of 2018, 53% of adults (people aged 15 and over) were accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART), compared to 39% in 2015

West and Central Africa has made significant progress in expanding access to HIV treatment in the past three years. At the end of 2018, 53% of adults (people aged 15 and over) were accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART), compared to 39% in 2015[i]. However, the region still lags behind East and Southern…

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    • Antimicrobial resistance on his own leg turns a Kenyan health worker into an advocate for wiser use of antibiotics (1)
    • Antimicrobial resistance on his own leg turns a Kenyan health worker into an advocate for wiser use of antibiotics (2)
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Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Antimicrobial resistance on his own leg turns a Kenyan health worker into an advocate for wiser use of antibiotics

When the thigh wound grew bigger, the health worker, being well versed in the perils of contagion, feared it would trigger an internal infection

Josphat, a health worker based in Nairobi, needed a skin graft on his leg in 2013. But then, what is typically a common procedure nowadays became a medical nightmare. The donor site on his thigh took longer to heal than expected and was nonresponsive to conventional antibiotics. Laboratory tests revealed…

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    • Weak Vaccine-Preventable Disease Surveillance Could Cost the African Region $22.4 billion over the next decade, World Health Organization (WHO) Warns (1)
    • Weak Vaccine-Preventable Disease Surveillance Could Cost the African Region $22.4 billion over the next decade, World Health Organization (WHO) Warns (2)
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Source: WHO Regional Office for Africa |

Weak Vaccine-Preventable Disease Surveillance Could Cost the African Region $22.4 billion over the next decade, World Health Organization (WHO) Warns

Vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) surveillance is a critical component of the integrated disease control strategies and an effective way to detect and respond early to outbreaks

In its newly launched Investment Case for Vaccine-Preventable Disease Surveillance in the African Region, 2020-2030, the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa’s highlights the drastic consequences that could be in store for the region, if countries do not invest in disease surveillance efforts – including a US$22.4 billion economic burden…